Oxford University Touring Team to Austria & Vienna (1899)

Standing (L to R): Seated (L to R): In the squad & but not pictured here:

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Shirley Herbert Jerome Russell (GK), (1876-1942), of Keble College, born in Chislehurst, Kent, into a distinguished British family, the son of a vicar, Henry Lloyd Russell, and Katherine Elizabeth Willsford Hocking, he was christened at Chislehurst on 1 November 1876. He attended Forest School (Walthamstow), a school with a long sporting tradition; it has the distinction of being the only school to have competed in the FA Cup (1876). Shirley played in the Varsity Matches of 1897-98 and 1898-99. He became headmaster of Wellesley House School, a prep. school in Broadstairs, Kent, and wrote Latin vocabularies for preparatory schools, 1912. Just before WWI he bought the school. Shirley was a 2nd Lt. in the Kent Volunteer Regt. in the war, which claimed the lives of two of his partners, Herbert Day and Leonard Moon, the international cricketer and footballer. One of his pupils, the poet Gavin Ewart, described him as, "the most sympathetic schoolmaster I ever came across," and the atmosphere as having been "comparatively liberal" (Civil humor: the poetry of Gavin Ewart By Stephen W. Delchamps, Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2002). Since he was running a business as well as teaching, he was a member of Broadstairs & St Peters Chamber of Commerce, of which he was president in the 1930s. He played golf for Forest (old boys) in the Halford Hewitt competition. Interestingly, the late John Vivian Shelby had told me that it was through the suggestion of a friend of MM Morgan-Owen that he found himself teaching at Wellesley House; he was there from 1929 to 1939. John's plans to become a partner in the school were interrupted by WWII. Shirley was still headmaster in 1939 when the pupils were evacuated and the school was occupied by the army. He died at Wadhurst, Sussex, aged 65 [Hastings 1942, 1st qt].

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William James Lindsay Wallace (RB) (1877-1937), of Balliol College, was a son of William Wallace, Whyte's Professor of Moral Philosophy, Oxford, and Janet Barclay, both natives of Fifeshire, Scotland; William (the son) was there and still a student at the time of the 1901 census. He played in the Varsity Match of 1898-99. He joined 4th Bn., the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, in WWI but he had to relinquish his commission on account of ill health in May, 1918, when he was granted the honorary rank of Lieutenant. When he died on 17 May 1937, aged 60, he was living at 3 Clarendon Villas, Parktown, Oxford, and probate was granted to his widow, Marguerite Leoni Bentnall Wallace, though I have found no evidence of their marriage and her death at the age of 64 [Isle of Wight 1944, 1st qt] was registered under her maiden name of Brentall; she had been living on the Isle of Wight with her parents in 1911. I believe William was the father of Group Capt. Richard Lindsey Wallace, CBE, AFC (1909-2002).

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William Blackburn (LB) of Oriel College, son of a wealthy cotton merchant, William Blackburn, and Sarah Ann Leckenby, was born in 1878 [Chorlton 1878, 3rd qt] in Withington, Lancashire, and played in three successive Varsity Matches, captaining in his final appearance, 1900/01.

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Morgan Maddox Morgan-Owen (RHB). Click here to open his life history in a new window (NB This current window will remain open).

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Stanley Ernest Osborne (MHB) (1870/71-1943), Exhibitionist of Keble College, the middle child of seven children of William Henry Osborne, vicar and farmer, and Mary Anne Newman, was educated at St John Foundation School, Leatherhead, Surrey. He played in three successive Varsity matches in 1897-98, 1898-99 and 1899-1900. He was ordained and became curate of Ulverston (1900-1906), Bromley (1906-1919) and then vicar of Orpington. He married [Ulverston 1914, 3rd qt] Mary F Hodgson.

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Francis (Frank) Wentworth Tomlinson (LHB) (1877-1963) of University College, born in 1877 [Huddersfield 1877, 4th qt] and christened on 18 December that year, the son of wealthy Huddersfield engineer and machine maker, George William Tomlinson, and Charlotte Heron. Educated at Charterhouse (football XI 1895-96), he played in none of the Varsity Matches. In 1900 he joined 2nd Battalion (Regular) ‘The Buffs’ (Royal East Kent Regiment) and served in the S African War (1899-1902). He was invalided out of Natal in July 1902, aboard The Avoca. This site indicates that some time prior to 1912 he collected items from Asia that he donated to the Pitt Rivers Museum, which holds the University of Oxford's collection of anthropology and world archaeology, and also that he was a member of the Society of Antiquaries; by 1951 he was a Fellow of this Society. Frank was wounded at the 2nd Battle of Ypres when he, along with those of his company who had not been killed in the engagement, were captured. There is a description of the incident on this page which states:

The 24th April [1915] proved an unfortunate day. ... at 7 a.m. Captain Tomlinson's B Company, which had been detached late on the 22nd to the succour of the Canadians, was completely surrounded by the enemy, and after losing very heavily, practically all the survivors were made prisoners. ... The Canadians and others who saw this company attack stated that this little force was entirely responsible for the saving of the Canadian left, and also that practically the whole company was killed, wounded or taken prisoner, including Tomlinson, who had again shown great gallantry.
Frank was a friend of a lady called Mabel Eden who mentioned him in her diaries. This page reveals how Frank was captured and spent much of the war in a POW camp. (His is the 22nd name from the bottom of the list. Click on the 1916 POW picture for an enlargement; it shows Frank (seated third form left) amongst the POWs at Furstenburg). Frank was the author of Canterbury Papers No.2 - The Warriors' Chapel and The Buffs. In the archives of Glasgow University there is a typed letter, dated 26 November 1921 and signed by Frank, a major at that time (he had been promoted in 1915), to D.S. MacColl. Historical Section (Military Branch), Committee of Imperial Defence, London, asking MacColl's advice about designing a Memorial Book containing the names of all ranks of his regiment (The Buffs) who lost their lives in the Great War. It was to be placed in the Warriors' Chapel in Canterbury Cathedral. The book, recording the names of the 6000 men of the Buffs who died in WWI, was indeed placed there and I believe it may have been Frank who instigated the moving daily ceremony that ensued. Every day, at eleven o’ clock, the time of the Armistice, the clanging of a bell from the WWI cruiser HMS Canterbury, is followed by prayers for remembrance and for peace led by the Chaplain and then a former Buff turns a page in one of the books of remembrance. Though the Buffs ceased to exist as a regiment in 1972, I believe this poignant ceremony continues to this day. Frank also edited The Ancient Town and Port of Sandwich. Official handbook (1937) . He was the Honorary Secretary, Canterbury Excavation Committee (here is a report he wrote on one of their digs) and he was instrumental in organising the excavation of the roman theatre at Canterbury. In 1954 he donated some Saxon grave-finds to the Kent Archaeological Society. I believe Frank died in 1963, aged 85 [Folkstone 1963, 3rd qt].

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Gilbert Claude Vassall (Captain & OSR) (1876-1941) of Oriel College, was born on 5 April 1876, the son of Rev. William Vassall, then rector of Hardington Mandeville, Somerset, and Martha Ann Skelton. He represented Charterhouse and Oxford University at both long-jump (President of OUAC, 1899) and football and played in four consecutive Varsity Matches, captaining on the final occasion in 1898-9. He also played football for Yeovil Casuals, 1901-2 and in six appearances for Oxford City (1902-1906) he scored eight goals. With Morgan Maddox Morgan-Owen, he played for Corinthians; they toured eastern Canada and USA together in 1906. He played for Old Carthusians, Winners of the London Charity Cup, 1896, of the Arthur Dunn Cup, 1904, ’05, ’06, ’07, ’09, ’10, and was selected to play for England v Ireland in February, 1899, but withdrew. He played cricket for Somerset six times (1902-05) during school holidays since he was a schoolmaster at the Dragon School in Oxford until his death; by then he was joint headmaster. He married at Holy Trinity, Yeovil, in 1902 [Yeovil 1902, 1st qt], Rosa Mary, daughter of the Rev. William Laurence Cotter, Rector of West Coker, Somerset. She died in 1928 and in 1929 he married, secondly, Brenda E O'Ferrall [Uckfield (Sussex) 1929, 3rd qt] and they had a daughter Susan E A Vassall [b Headington, 1932, 2nd qt]; she married Douglas J N Malcomess [Oxford 1954, 2nd qt]. Gilbert died on 19 September 1941.

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William Lionel Henry Moss (ISR) (1879-1963), of Oriel College, was born on 6 October 1879, the son of William Moss, a Classics Master at Charterhouse, and Eliza Isabella S Gordon. He played football and cricket for Charterhouse 1896-1898, captaining the cricket XI in his final year, and for Oxford University Next XV (1901) but he played in no football Varsity Matches. His appearance for RA Williams's XI against FH Hollins's XI in 1901 in an Oxford University Seniors cricket match illustrated that he was a fair all-rounder; he scored 49 in the first innings and bowled the opening three batsmen in the second innings. He became a land agent and subsequently a planter in Kyambu, Kenya, a district just north of Nairobi; he was there both before and after WWI. He appears to have served as an officer in the Army Service Corps in the war; if so he was a temporary Captain when he completed his service in February 1919. He visited England from Kenya in 1920 and he may have returned to live in England in 1928 when he stated that he was undecided as to where he was going to live permanently; his temporary address was to be c/o E R Godson Esq, Charterhouse, Godalming, Surrey. He died, aged 83 [Surrey NW 1963, 3rd qt].

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(Charles) Frederick Ryder (M), demy (a form of scholarship) at Magdalen College, Oxford, was born in London in 1879 [Pancras 1879 2nd qt], a son of George W Ryder of Hassocks, Sussex, a very wealthy jeweller and partner in the firm of Messrs. London & Ryder, jewellers of New Bond Street, London, and Lucy M Morgan (born in Paris). Frederick was a contemporary of the writer E M Forster at the private “Kent House School” before attending Charterhouse, where he represented the school at cricket, captaining in his final year, football and rackets. He also played cricket and football for Old Carthusians Winners of the London Senior Cup (1899) and the Arthur Dunn Cup (1903 and 1905). At Oxford he played in three successive Varsity football matches (1898-99, 1899-1900, 1900-01). In 1901 he played in an unofficial football game for England at White Hart Lane, England beating Germany 12-0. In WWI he was a member of the General Staff Intelligence, Egyptian Army, and rose to the rank of Lt. Col. He joined the Sudan Civil Service, Legal Department, and became director-general of public security, where he had to cope with troubles that arose in 1919, partly caused by resentment against the British who had made Egypt a Protectorate in 1914. This resulted in Egypt being granted nominal independence in 1922, with the exception of four "reserved" areas: foreign relations, communications, the military and the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan. Ryder remained there and in the late 1920s played in at least three cricket matches at the Gezira Sporting Club Ground, Cairo. He became an OBE (Military Division) in the New Year Honours List of 1919 for valuable services rendered in connection with military operations in Egypt and in 1932 was awarded the Order of the Nile, Insignia of the Third Class. He may have died in Hampshire in 1952 [Basingstoke, 1952, 2nd qt].

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Frank Hubert Hollins (ISL) (1877-1963) 2nd son of Frank Hollins (1st Baronet of Grey Friars, Broughton) and Dora Emily Susan Cox, was born on 31 October 1877 at Bowness-on-Windermere, Westmorland. Sir Frank headed the prestigious cotton spinning company of Horrockses, Crewdson and Co which had become one of the largest cotton spinning concerns in the world following mergers, one of which was with his company of Hollins, Bothers & Co. Frank, the son, although he played in the 1898-99 football Varsity match, was better known as a cricketer. He was in the Eton XI of 1896 and gained a Blue at Oxford in 1901 as well as playing for various other Oxford University XIs. Between 1902 and 1904, he occasionally played for Lancashire and in 1903 at Worcester hit his one century in first-class cricket, scoring 114. He played for other teams including MCC and his tours included West Indies and Amsterdam. He fought with 9th Rifle Brigade in France in WWI, reaching the rank of acting major. In 1928 he stated that he had no occupation. Ten years later he succeeded his brother, Arthur, to the baronetage, which became extinct with his own death, aged 62, on 31 January 1963 at Paddington, London.

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Edward Mellor Jameson (Secretary) (OSL) Ireland Exhibitioner of Oriel, (1877-1858), was born on 27 November 1877, a son of cotton-spinner, Frederick Bland Jameson of Heywod, Lancs, and Elizabeth Anne Mellor. He played in Charterhouse football 1st XI for three successive years, captaining in the final year, 1895-6, and in 1896 won its Athletic Challenge Cup. He played football in 4 successive Varsity matches, captaining in 1900, his final year, and also played for Old Carthusians, winners of the Amateur Cup, 1897. He was ordained and after a brief interlude as curate of St Leonard’s. Bridgenorth, he became a master at Charterhouse; he later wrote a book about the school. He married firstly, wealthy Valeriana Ana Davidson, only daughter of J. Davidson of Buenos Aires by whom he had three daughters. They divorced in 1913 after her affair with a taxi driver. He married secondly in 1922 Muriel Amy (aka ‘Moo Moo’!) Thomas.

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Arthur Meyrick Hollins (sub) (1876-1938), of Hertford College, born on 16 July 1876, was the eldest son of Frank Hollins (1st Baronet of Grey Friars, Broughton) and Dora Emily Susan Cox (see above). He played football and cricket – he played in the Varsity match of 1899 – for the university and competed in athletics against Cambridge for three years but he never played in a Varsity football match, thus narrowly missing being a triple blue. In 1908 he married Mary Prudence Thwaites. In WWI he acquired the rank of Temp. Capt. 11th (Service) Batt., Royal N. Lancashire Regt. He became a director of Horrockses, Crewdson and Co and from 1922 until his death he was chairman of Preston North End Football Club. He was also president of Preston Cricket Club and vice president of Lancashire County Cricket Club. In 1928 he was High Sheriff of Lancashire. In 1924 he succeeded as baronet on the death of his father. On his death, 30 July1938 [Amounderness 1938, 3rd qt], the title passed to his brother, Frank.

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